Housing for Adults with Autism

Why is it so difficult to imagine a new way to provide affordable living arrangements for adults with autism and other intellectual disabilities?

Recently, meeting with parents of my daughter’s group home house-mates, I heard many complaints about how things were going; poor quality diet, inadequate supervision, not enough activities individually and not enough group activities. Poor communication headed the list; the staff does not communicate with each other, they do not listen to parents, parent’s calls and emails are not returned, nothing seems to change.

One parent stated what I have heard many times: Compared to all the others, this is the best program, we are very fortunate to have found this agency and a place for our daughter. In general, parents of severely disabled children are very grateful for anyone willing to help care for their children, knowing first hand how challenging the work can be.

Being grateful does not mean we must be complacent. We must continually push for the most basic needs to be addressed; food, clothing, shelter, health. What about happiness? Learning? Community? Growth? We have no time to address these issues when we are always dealing with basic needs. Just because this is “the best there is” doesn’t mean there is no room for improvement.

The current system here in Massachusetts is no doubt better than in other states and countries because of our emphasis on education and our relative financial well-being. Major court decisions forced regulations and changes in the system, moving away from institutions and nursing homes towards community supports and inclusion. The funding for these supports is continually under attack by the legislature in these and previous budget cutting times.

I dream of a different scenario entirely, one that is supported by many changes in the Affordable Care Act, (aka Obamacare). The new system is based on what the individuals and their families actually need and not what an agency or department needs. Money is spent more wisely and efficiently when the recipients have a say in how the money is spent. The care providers are held accountable by the families and individuals who receive the services and not by the agencies that provide them resulting in less money spent for higher quality services and better outcomes.

I have no difficulty imagining a better way of living for my daughter and I am looking for others who share my dreams. I will struggle against the entrenched cemented antiquated ideas of the current system until I convince enough people that there is a better way. This will be my only legacy when I leave the realm of earth and hopefully others may follow and my daughter will have a happy and fulfilling life when I am gone.

Am I tilting at windmills?

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5 thoughts on “Housing for Adults with Autism

  1. Can you share with us what a happy and fulfilling life for Lily might look like? Those of you who have lived with a loved one who suffers from autism are the best ones to describe the better world for the rest of us. I know what I hoped for in terms of my own children, and what I hope for my grandson. What do you hope for Lily?

  2. Thoughtful and thought-provoking post, Catherine. And if you don’t tilt at windmills you’ll accept the status quo the way the others are doing. I very much admire what you’re trying to accomplish.

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