Creativity:Planning for a Happy and Fulfilling Life

This is an attempt to think out loud about what would enhance my daughter’s life in the area of creativity. Here is a photo of her at school a few years ago, rolling her eyes while being asked to make Christmas decorations out of recycling materials.

(The shortened bangs are the result of the birthday cake incident that I spoke of in a previous post.)

When we are children our lives are filled with manufactured opportunities for creativity; the day-care or preschool activities include finger painting, watercolor painting, painting rocks, play dough, clay, making collages out of pasta shapes, nature collages, paper mache, plaster casts, block printmaking, music, drumming, recorder, symbols, singing, listening, dancing, stories, making up stories, acting out plays, pretend play with toys or with other children and adults; the list can be endless if the adults are imaginative and value instilling creativity in their young children.

Of course, it could just be that there are not enough quality care givers in day care and schools or that the parents are over worked and over stressed and the TV becomes the babysitter and creativity takes a back seat.

For Lily as a child all the messy arts were extremely problematic as she could never get the idea that you were not meant to eat the play dough or paint your mouth. This has not significantly changed in that often she cannot overcome her impulse to put everything in her mouth and if it has a lovely color or texture even better! At school they were able to gradually introduce the idea that she could roll out snakes of clay without eating it and paint on some glaze without sucking on the brush.

Smelling the candle

(If I could show you the other kids in her class you would see that they are all contemplating eating the candle.)

The school Lily attended valued music and art highly. Many lessons were devoted to using crayons and paints to color and copy pictures over and over again. Lily hated to color and I was never sure if she kept eating crayons because she enjoyed it or because she wanted to get out of doing the activity. She never learned to play the violin but she did learn the keyboard harmonica. She really detested practicing and would only demonstrate her proficiency under ideal circumstances.

The only art project Lily ever seemed to enjoy was the one where you make strips and shapes of color by ripping up magazine pages then glue it on the paper in various ways. It might be abstract or maybe “painting “in the shapes of the picture with paper instead of marker or crayon. The result was always beautiful to my eyes and she liked to do it! She also would take pieces of words to build sentences, but that required a lot more encouragement on my part and she felt more pressure to perform in a way that she wasn’t sure that she could.

What she really loves is listening to music and dancing. She loves all kinds of music including “Classical” music and symphonies, Afro-pop, The Beatles, Hip Hop/R&B and Mom and Dad’s old rock and roll. She dances with a side to side swaying motion, holding on to her partner with both arms, often from around your back with her hands locked on your arms.

Even though Lily has no speech and cannot write, she nevertheless enjoys hearing stories and poetry read aloud. She has little attention span for boring wordy plays or TV shows, but if it has music she will watch with glee. Disney always pleases and The Little Mermaid is a favorite.

One thing that distinguishes severe autism from other intellectual disabilities is that the children have no pretend play. They do not make up scenarios with their dolls or cars or feed their stuffed animals. They spin the wheels on the trucks instead of race around the floor with them. There is very little back and forth play and this makes it very challenging for the teacher or care giver to play creatively with them and hold their attention.

To imagine a creative life for Lily as an adult, I have to think of what Lily actually likes to do, what I think Lily is currently cognitively able to do, what might be Lily’s cognitive capacity in the future, and what her care givers would be able and motivated to help her achieve.

From the above list, the only thing that stands out is music and dance.    We must somehow convince her direct care staff that it would be more fun for everyone if they turned on the lights in the living room, put on some music, and let it all hang out!

As for expanding the list of possibilities for Lily in the future, stay tuned!

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4 thoughts on “Creativity:Planning for a Happy and Fulfilling Life

  1. I love the image of all the young people dancing! and am wondering if something like water aerobics to music (little mermaid songs?!) would be a pleasurable creative time that’s also exercise? x0x Alice

  2. Interesting, that severely autistic people have no pretend play. I didn’t know that. More evidence of the complexity of the cognitive process.

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