Study Finds Mercury in More Northeastern Bird Species – NYTimes.com

Study Finds Mercury in More Northeastern Bird Species – NYTimes.com.

Mercury poisoning is one of the environmental toxins implicated in the uptick in numbers of children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Our children are like the canaries in the coal mines, like the wood thrushes in Maine, vulnerable and damaged.

The “Honorable ” Governor of the Great State of Maine (he whose name shall not be spoken), wants to gut all environmental laws enacted to lessen mercury and other pollutants in the environment.

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Examining the unexamined life of an adult with autism: Part 1

This is the first in a series of posts examining the question of what I think might lead to a happy and fulfilling life for my adult autistic daughter, Lily.

The first and most essential basis for a happy life is that ones basic needs of food and water, shelter and warmth, health and safety should be adequately met. Some might argue that these are Human Rights and I think we would agree that they are at least American Rights. (For some reason Republicans are now balking at the idea that Health is a human right but this is relatively new. Richard Nixon practically invented Health Care Reform).

Because Lily has little sense of self-protection or awareness of danger, she needs people who care about her to watch over her at all times and they need to be trained and vigilant. They must help her prepare food and must be trained in adequate nutrition on a small food budget and how to prepare foods safely. The staff help her care for her house and keep it clean. They drive her to and fro in a van and take her into the community. They keep her safe from harm and keep her from harming herself.

Staff who work with Lily must also be watchful and aware of subtle changes in behavior that might indicate a medical problem and be active in searching out the cause.  New “behavior” is not just a “behavior”; but, might indicate a physical or emotional problem. They must take her to the appropriate health care provider for evaluation, (providing they can find one willing to care for a nonverbal autistic person on Medicaid).

I think basic needs must be met first before expanding upon the other areas of life that enhance happiness and fulfillment. Maybe some ascetics and monks can claim happiness and fulfillment on an empty belly, but not most and not my Lily.

There are adult persons with autism who need less support in these areas of  basic need but they might still need help for a number of years managing life in a more independent living arrangement.

Unfortunately, when communities and states need to cut budgets for social services because the tax rate is so low, lower than it has ever been in this country, too low to maintain our standards of living, too low to provide for basic needs for the elderly and disabled, the already low wages paid to direct care workers in these support service industries are so low that the quality of direct care workers suffers.

I am dealing with these issues of poor quality staff and unmet basic needs every day now. Although it is frustrating that Lily is not being challenged to learn skills or even maintain skills, the more pressing problems are adequate nutrition and safety.

Why does our society now value keeping money in the pockets of the rich  over basic human rights for the disabled, the elderly and the very, very poor?

Happy and Fulfilling Life for a Person with Autism

What makes a happy and fulfilling life for a person with autism? What makes a life fulfilling and happy for a person without autism?

The theme of what it takes to make a happy and fulfilling life is not a new one. When my loyal reader asked what I think would make a happy life for my daughter Lily, I made a list of areas that I consider essential components of life to explore and examine.

  • Basic needs
  • Learning and growth
  • Fun and recreation
  • Joy
  • Spiritual
  • Creative
  • Family and Friends: Relationships

As I have written before in these pages, I am not satisfied with Lily’s adult program. I do not think it meets her needs in any of the above areas. My task, as I see it now, is to examine these areas and develop a program that does meet her needs. I have done similar exercises for my own life at times when I was unhappy or felt unfulfilled. The examination can be fun and very enlightening.

Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck. 

—The 14th Dalai Lama

Mourning does not become me

Your child with autism is not the child that you thought you would have.

Following a twitter link, I came across a book, “Following Ezra” by Tom Fields-Meyer, that deals with how he has approached his child who has autism.  There are also interesting comments on his blog.

The question posed is whether or not you should mourn for the child you did not have. The author of the book has a refreshing view; he tries to celebrate the child that he does have, instead.

After many years of effort, I have been able to approach that attitude with some success.

When you give birth to a baby that is, from the start, not quite right in some way, you can grieve, accept and move on to face the challenges ahead.  However, if your baby seems quite lovely and intelligent and you lose her to autism at the age of 1 or 2, then it seems as if the child she was has died.  You have no time to mourn her death because you are thrust into dealing with enormous challenges.  You push the feelings aside and try to keep your head above water searching for answers and trying therapies, dealing with the day-to-day.

Once in a while you can glimpse that former child in the child you have; there is always the hope that you can get her back.  So you put off the mourning and accepting a bit longer.

When I have allowed myself to mourn, (or wallow in the grief more like), it can be paralyzing.  My thoughts become circular and pointless and I am unable to productively deal with the crisis at hand.  And there is always a crisis.

That is the challenge: to break the attachment to the hope that you will get the first child back and relish the rewards of who she has become.  Or not become.  Not riding around in cars with boys, not taking illicit drugs,  not doing the scary things we associate with teenage girls.

And when you do follow her around you find someone who is quite lovely indeed.

Health Care Disparities: Not just for the Physically Disabled

Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities suffer from health and health care disparities that are not addressed in most discussions of this topic.

Many studies document disparities in access and quality of health care and the resulting health problems for minority and disadvantaged  populations.  The ADA highlights issues for those with physical disabilities. However, there are few published studies documenting the increased morbidity and mortality of those whose disabilities are less vocally obvious, for those who cannot speak for themselves.  I am attempting to add my voice to speak for them as best I can by speaking with and educating physician and hospital groups.

The current issue of the magazine Health Affairs is devoted to Health and Health Care Disparities HERE.  The following abstract addresses the issue of disabilities in general.

  • Fifty-four million people in the United States currently live with disabilities, notes author Lisa I. Iezzoni of Massachusetts General Hospital, who says that eliminating health and health care disparities in this population should be a national priority. The number of people with disabilities is set to grow substantially in the next 30 years as the baby-boom generation ages and children and young adults face complications related to overweight and obesity.  People with disabilities confront disparities in their use of preventive and other health services, and health care professionals often get little training in how to care for people with disabilities.

Eating with Autism-2

There is controversy around the various ‘bio-medical’ treatments of autism and one of the most controversial areas is diet.  Many parents and physicians think that their children with autism are helped by restrictive diets of one form or another, the most common variant being the gluten-free/casein-free diet. Others include Feingold diet, the Specific Carbohydrate diet and the low-oxalate diet.

A recent study of the nutritional issues in autism can be found HERE.

When my daughter was  in her late teens she developed symptoms of anxiety: pacing, increased tantrums, aggression toward some of her teachers and upper GI symptoms of regurgitation and belching.  The neurologist recommended trying medication with risperidone.  I was not ready to make that leap at the time and the school did not approve of medications for behavior control anyway.

The school did not approve of  restrictive diets and supplements either.  Their method was to increase the student’s tolerance for a variety of foods by slowly encouraging new tastes, smells and textures.  Many children with autism are undernourished because of multiple food aversions and self-restriction.

After I attended a conference on the bio-medical treatment for autism put on by the group Defeat Autism Now! (DAN!),  I thought that it could not hurt to try some diet and supplement changes to see if it would help.  The school was willing to try the gluten-free/casein-free diet for 3 months and we also gave her some vitamins C and B as well as a balanced fish oil supplement.

The short story is that her behavior and happiness level improved immensely with this small change in what she ate.  Even her teachers admitted that she was able to control herself more easily and that she was able to concentrate longer in class. We added some digestive enzymes and things continued to improve.   When the neurologist mentioned trying a low-glycemic index diet for seizure control we instituted that as well.   Her last year at school was her best ever.   Her noise aversion disappeared and she was able to enjoy bowling for the first time.  She began learning to use a communication device and was more connected with people and more social.  Her gastrointestinal symptoms improved and she was more purposefully energetic.

The longer story is that when she transitioned into the adult world they refused to continue her diet  and despite many attempts to change things we have been completely unsuccessful in instituting even a reasonably healthy diet at her house.  We think we are making headway, we get nutritionists and dietitians involved, we get a commitment from the Agency to provide the diet (which is prescribed by a physician), then the staff at the house changes and all is lost to the wind.

Now, sadly, we have been forced to go the medication route anyway and are dealing with yet another set of side effects.  We are also changing seizure medication; tapering up and tapering down.  And we have yet another house manager to educate about food.

I am in constant awe of the parents who have been able to keep their children at home, who have control over what  their children eat and how they are treated.  It is extremely difficult to maintain these restrictive diets even at home and it takes maximum dedication and caring to do so.

So stop making fun of those over-protective moms who won’t let their kids eat the birthday cake; support them instead and be glad you do not have to do it at your house.

Eating with Autism-1

One of my favorite measures of “well-being” is eating and appetite; when we are happy and contented, most of us enjoy eating and sharing meals with friends and family.  When anxiety and depression set in, this simple and universal pleasure is lost to us.

A recent piece in the New York Times shows families of all types eating together and enjoying the “feeling that everything is going to be all right, if only for the moment”.  The photos are by Stephanie Sinclair and text by Sam Sifton.

Our family, like many these days, does not gather together often enough because of international travel for work and the life styles of our extended families. We did recently have my husband and his three siblings gathered in our house and our daughter who has severe autism was able to join us.

We had been warned by her staff at her group home that she had been unstable and dangerous after a recent medication change.  They advised us not to bring her home for this gathering.  What a mistake that would have been.  In the loving arms of her family, eating, talking and laughing about good memories, her anxieties melted away and we enjoyed the best times for a long time, all with family.

If only we did not all live on opposite ends of the earth…