Abuse and Neglect, New York State Promises to Pay Anyway

Sometimes, late at night, when the house is asleep, I finally have time to think about writing. Sometimes, though, I am just too tired for words.  This holiday time, when my daughter and husband make more demands than my usual dog and cat feed me level of demand, has been particularly draining. Sickness has prevailed as in many homes this time of year. I am energized by some recent articles in the New York Times to start writing this tonight before my energy is completely gone and my “rage” ( if that is the word) dwindles into the regular hyper-activity of the next day.

The Times has been running a series about the New York State system for care of their adult developmentally disabled population, most recently HERE, and HERE.

These articles enrage me because…well need I even say why?  They over-medicate, abuse and neglect these fragile people, and then they profit from it?  Is there a special layer of Dante’s Hell for these people?

Penn State, Friday Night Lights: Lessons for the Disabled Community

With all the opinions voiced about the Penn State scandal and who should have told or shouldn’t have and all the money and college athletics politics involved, many have lost sight of the facts of how and why the children were targeted for abuse in the first place.

Disadvantaged children, like disabled children,  are so much more vulnerable to this sort of thing.  Did the boys have anyone at home to tell of their experiences who would have believed them?  Were they also targets at home?  Hungry for love and attention, did they trust this sexual predator like a father figure and not want to lose him, even though they did not like what was done to them?  Was he a kind man,  under other guises, a man they trusted and looked up to and felt safe with?

Disabled children and adults are often not able to tell of their experiences with abuse, and, if they do find a way, are often not believed.  The abusers are then able to make their lives even more miserable.

There was a recent story in the New York Times, part of the long-running expose of the New York State department that cares for the disabled, that details how the whistle blowers names were not kept anonymous, despite State laws requiring it.  The workers making complaints were retaliated against by their supervisors and punished for coming forward, while the perpetrators went completely unpunished.

The grad student who reported seeing the abuse that he witnessed in the locker room to Joe Paterno was lucky that he kept his job.

Joe Paterno, aged though he is, if he was the coach they all thought he was, could have seen through all the layers and done the right thing.   A Daily Beast article, (here), by Abby Wolf, so wonderfully compares the Penn State actions to what the coach from Friday Night Lights might have done; the character building coach would have struggled, but his own higher standards would have prevailed.

(In case you do not watch TV or are unfamiliar with Friday Night Lights, the TV series captivated many American football widows who would not normally have enjoyed the games but were captivated by the characters of a small city in Texas and their football coach.)

I wish I knew that such a man existed in the agency running my daughter’s program; a man who would call the police and not cover up abuse.  Where are the Coach Eric Taylors in the real world?  Are there any in your life?