Examining the unexamined life of an adult with autism: Part 1

This is the first in a series of posts examining the question of what I think might lead to a happy and fulfilling life for my adult autistic daughter, Lily.

The first and most essential basis for a happy life is that ones basic needs of food and water, shelter and warmth, health and safety should be adequately met. Some might argue that these are Human Rights and I think we would agree that they are at least American Rights. (For some reason Republicans are now balking at the idea that Health is a human right but this is relatively new. Richard Nixon practically invented Health Care Reform).

Because Lily has little sense of self-protection or awareness of danger, she needs people who care about her to watch over her at all times and they need to be trained and vigilant. They must help her prepare food and must be trained in adequate nutrition on a small food budget and how to prepare foods safely. The staff help her care for her house and keep it clean. They drive her to and fro in a van and take her into the community. They keep her safe from harm and keep her from harming herself.

Staff who work with Lily must also be watchful and aware of subtle changes in behavior that might indicate a medical problem and be active in searching out the cause.  New “behavior” is not just a “behavior”; but, might indicate a physical or emotional problem. They must take her to the appropriate health care provider for evaluation, (providing they can find one willing to care for a nonverbal autistic person on Medicaid).

I think basic needs must be met first before expanding upon the other areas of life that enhance happiness and fulfillment. Maybe some ascetics and monks can claim happiness and fulfillment on an empty belly, but not most and not my Lily.

There are adult persons with autism who need less support in these areas of  basic need but they might still need help for a number of years managing life in a more independent living arrangement.

Unfortunately, when communities and states need to cut budgets for social services because the tax rate is so low, lower than it has ever been in this country, too low to maintain our standards of living, too low to provide for basic needs for the elderly and disabled, the already low wages paid to direct care workers in these support service industries are so low that the quality of direct care workers suffers.

I am dealing with these issues of poor quality staff and unmet basic needs every day now. Although it is frustrating that Lily is not being challenged to learn skills or even maintain skills, the more pressing problems are adequate nutrition and safety.

Why does our society now value keeping money in the pockets of the rich  over basic human rights for the disabled, the elderly and the very, very poor?

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Housing for Adults with Autism

Why is it so difficult to imagine a new way to provide affordable living arrangements for adults with autism and other intellectual disabilities?

Recently, meeting with parents of my daughter’s group home house-mates, I heard many complaints about how things were going; poor quality diet, inadequate supervision, not enough activities individually and not enough group activities. Poor communication headed the list; the staff does not communicate with each other, they do not listen to parents, parent’s calls and emails are not returned, nothing seems to change.

One parent stated what I have heard many times: Compared to all the others, this is the best program, we are very fortunate to have found this agency and a place for our daughter. In general, parents of severely disabled children are very grateful for anyone willing to help care for their children, knowing first hand how challenging the work can be.

Being grateful does not mean we must be complacent. We must continually push for the most basic needs to be addressed; food, clothing, shelter, health. What about happiness? Learning? Community? Growth? We have no time to address these issues when we are always dealing with basic needs. Just because this is “the best there is” doesn’t mean there is no room for improvement.

The current system here in Massachusetts is no doubt better than in other states and countries because of our emphasis on education and our relative financial well-being. Major court decisions forced regulations and changes in the system, moving away from institutions and nursing homes towards community supports and inclusion. The funding for these supports is continually under attack by the legislature in these and previous budget cutting times.

I dream of a different scenario entirely, one that is supported by many changes in the Affordable Care Act, (aka Obamacare). The new system is based on what the individuals and their families actually need and not what an agency or department needs. Money is spent more wisely and efficiently when the recipients have a say in how the money is spent. The care providers are held accountable by the families and individuals who receive the services and not by the agencies that provide them resulting in less money spent for higher quality services and better outcomes.

I have no difficulty imagining a better way of living for my daughter and I am looking for others who share my dreams. I will struggle against the entrenched cemented antiquated ideas of the current system until I convince enough people that there is a better way. This will be my only legacy when I leave the realm of earth and hopefully others may follow and my daughter will have a happy and fulfilling life when I am gone.

Am I tilting at windmills?